AdWords Fundamentals Revision Guide Phone/Tablet App Review

I guess it’s that time again. Time to renew my Google AdWords certifications. Although I’ve put together a couple of popular study guides for the exams, one problem with them is that I need to navigate to the webpage in order to read the guide.

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Wouldn’t it be so much easier if I could review AdWords prep material on my phone? Maybe even take some practice exams while sitting in the car waiting for a train or waiting for an oil change?

Well, Singing Horse Studio has recently developed and released a smartphone/tablet app for just that purpose. Named the AdWords Fundamentals Revision Guide, it comes in very handy for on-the-go studying. It comes with 10 questions for free, with additional packs of 50 questions available for purchase.

The questions in the guide are all multiple choice, as in the real AdWords exam, and each question has references to the section of the official Google study documents that the question came from. Whether you got a question right or wrong, you can easily find the context of the answer.

Downloading the additional question packs are essential, though. Ten questions for the free “lite” version just aren’t enough to use as a study guide. Thankfully, the cost for each pack of questions is very little.

By randomizing 10-20 questions, studying for the exam becomes a lot easier and can be done almost anywhere in small portions. Think you’re ready for the entire exam? Then go through all 110 questions (or 60 if you’ve downloaded just one pack of questions).

Even better, the app will track your progress over time on the questions, showing you in clear terms whether you are getting better or not. On one screen, you can view your progress over your last 10 attempts to see how close you are getting to that magical 85% passing score.

Some of these questions are tough, too, more difficult than I remember the actual exam being. This is really the hallmark of a well-designed study guide. The practice exam should always be more difficult than the real one so you have the best chance to pass it. Real exams are more stressful than practice ones, so the study guide quizzes need to make up for that with more difficult questions.

No question, you should download this app if you’re studying for the Google AdWords Fundamentals Exam. Try out the first 10 questions on it for free, and if you’ve learned anything from them, then get at least one of the additional packs of 50 questions.

Should this be your only study material for the exam? Probably not. Read the official study guide from Google, read a few books and study guides, and download this app for review once you’re closer to the exam. Then go through questions in small chunks until your AdWords knowledge feels rock solid, and take the full 60-110 question exam on your phone/tablet as a “final review” of sorts.

Singing Horse Studio’s AdWords Fundamentals Revision Guide should be part of your AdWords study toolkit going forward. Hopefully, they will come out with apps for the Advanced Search and Advanced Display exams in the future, but the current app should help far more people pass their AdWords exam.

By providing a portable Q&A app focusing on the exam, they’ve filled one of the huge gaps in the current knowledge base of AdWords. After using it periodically for several weeks now, my knowledge of AdWords has markedly increased.

You can visit the Singing Horse Studio website directly, follow them on Twitter, or like them on Facebook.

88 Questions You Need to Know for the Google AdWords Advanced Display Exam

After a long-awaited absence, the Traffic Motion guides to the Google exams are back. This time, we’ll be focusing on the Google AdWords Advanced Display certification exam. This test is quite a bit more difficult than the Fundamentals exam, so prepare yourself by reading the Display Network documentation that Google themselves have published on it.

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Much of the material on the Display Network is about YouTube ads, as Google is obviously attempting to make YouTube a profitable venture for investors and advertisers. Familiarize yourself with the YouTube advertising options in AdWords, as well as some of the ads available on YouTube itself. There are differences, as each platform has its own interface and advertising options.

Also, there are a lot of easy questions that I didn’t bother covering here. If you know anything at all about Google, AdWords, the Display Network, or YouTube, you should be able to get a fair number of questions correct. In addition, there are a decent number of repeat questions, just rephrased differently. For instance, make sure you know what Frequency Capping is and how it works, as well as the Display Ad Builder. Those topics will come up in quite a few questions, so if you get one right, you’ll probably get at least two or three more questions correct, too.

One final tip for preparing for this exam is to print out and read all of the documentation from Google, so that you can refer to it during the test. Thankfully, the material is less than 200 pages in length, so it’s not as big of a project to print out as either the Fundamentals or Search Advanced material. These questions and answers are provided only as suggestions and a guide, they won’t allow you to pass the test without extra studying.

Finally, good luck on the Advanced Display exam if you decide to take it! Please leave us a comment or share this study guide if it helped you at all.

Q: Using Google’s AdWords for Video, what type of video advertisement can you implement?
A: TrueVideo Video Ads can be implemented with AdWords for Video.

Q: What type of video still is best for an advertisement?
A: Something showing the action. If it’s a surfing video, for instance, show the part where the surfer is attempting to catch the wave, rather than paddling out to the wave or falling off of the surfboard.

Q: How is Quality Score affected when using cost-per-thousand-impressions bidding on Display ads?
A: QS is not affected because click-through rates are not a factor when using CPM bidding.

Q: True or False: You should consider minimum speed requirements in a reservation based campaign.
A: True

Q: True of False: You should consider the global availability of ad units and ad placements when planning a reservation based campaign.
A: True

Q: True or False: Think about submission and turnaround time for your creative and video assets when planning a reservation based campaign.
A: True

Q: True or False: Consider the bidding strategies of other advertisers when planning a reservation based campaign.
A: False

Q: If you want the best return on investment from a display campaign, what type of bidding option should you use in AdWords?
A: Conversion Optimization

Q: True or False: Adding a visible display URL is a good practice when using the Display Ad Builder?
A: True

Q: True or False: for YouTube, the majority of AdWords ads appear on Event pages.
A: False

Q: True or False: for YouTube, the majority of AdWords ads appear on Contest pages.
A: False

Q: True or False: for YouTube, the majority of AdWords ads appear on the YouTube homepage.
A: False

Q: True or False: for YouTube, the majority of AdWords ads appear on Watch pages.
A: True

Q: Which types of targeting can you use on YouTube?
A: Remarketing, topics, and interest categories

Q: How does an ad’s Quality Score work on the Display Network?
A: QS will affect whether your ads are eligible to enter the ad auction.

Q: True or False: Filling in gaps of niche and mass-marketed sites is one benefit of using AdWords targeting options, even if you use display advertising through other ad networks besides Google’s.
A: True

Q: Besides AdSense, where else can display inventory come from on the Google Display Network?
A: DoubleClick Ad Exchange

Q: When do TrueView in-state ads show on YouTube?
A: Only before YouTube partner videos that are at least 10 minutes in length.

Q: When can Ad Scheduling help your display campaign?
A: When you notice spikes in traffic to your website at certain times of the day.

Q: What can a Reach and Frequency report tell you about video ad play rates on a placement-targeted campaign?
A: Whether decreased play rates are an effect of viewers seeing an ad repeatedly and not watching it again.

Q: When using AdWords Conversion Tracking, which bidding strategy is best for driving traffic to a website along with ROI goals?
A: CPC bidding model

Q: How can you view your reservation-based reports for ads?
A: You’ll need to request it from your Google representative.

Q: When there are both CPM and CPC ads in an auction, what will the AdWords system do?
A: Calculate the effective CPM for ads.

Q: True or False: Allocating budget and controlling spending levels across campaigns is a benefit of having separate campaigns for Search and Display Network advertising.
A: True

Q: What would the Placement Report tell you?
A: Which Display Network properties displayed your ads, as well as related metrics.

Q: True or False: You can use the Placement Performance Report to see on which URLs users have seen your ads.
A: True

Q: True or False: different campaign settings may be better for different networks, so you should separate your Display and Search campaigns.
A: True

Q: True or False: If you want to do Remarketing and Product Listing Ads, you should set up separate campaigns for each.
A: True

Q: You are setting up a Display Campaign for a client. What is the first thing you should take into account?
A: The advertiser’s goals for the campaign.

Q: What will the On Schedule Indicator tell you?
A: It will show you the percent chance that the campaign will deliver all of the booked impressions for your ads.

Q: How can you get access to View-through conversion data?
A: You must be using the Conversion Tracking code on your website.

Q: True or False: A faster landing page load time could increase the Quality Score of your ad.
A: True

Q: What would a Remarketing campaign allow you to do?
A: Reach people who have previously visited your website and show them ads as they visit sites on the Google Display Network.

Q: What is a best practice for optimizing ad groups in a placement-targeted campaign?
A: Use Ad Groups to categorize placement-targeted sites with similar themes.

Q: True or False: YouTube ads can show up on the YouTube homepage.
A: True

Q: True or False: YouTube ads can run on videos that are part of the Partnership Program.
A: True

Q: How long must people watch TrueView in-stream ads on YouTube?
A: They play for at least 5 seconds, then users can keep watching or skip the ad.

Q: If you do not want to find and bid on individual placements, what is the best way to advertise on the Display Network?
A: Use the Conversion Optimizer.

Q: True or False: You can set language targeting options for campaigns that use ads on YouTube.
A: True

Q: For a campaign focused on branding, what is the best bidding option?
A: Cost-per-thousand-impressions

Q: True or False: clicks and impressions are key metrics for a branding campaign.
A: True

Q: What is the recommended minimum amount of time to let a display campaign run before analyzing performance metrics?
A: 2-3 weeks

Q: True or False: Text ads are the easiest to create on the Display Network.
A: True

Q: True or False: Video ads are the easiest to create on the Display Network.
A: False

Q: Where does YouTube rank in terms of search queries?
A: It has the second highest number of search queries in the world.

Q: What would you use to limit the impressions of an ad for a single unique user?
A: Frequency capping

Q: True or false: Conversions is the most important measurement in a direct response advertiser’s campaign on the Display Network.
A: True

Q: Your display ad has been disapproved. How can you submit a request for another review?
A: Save an edited version of the disapproved ad, or create a new ad.

Q: True or False: CPM bidding is available for the Search Network.
A: False

Q: True or False: CPM bidding is available for the Display Network.
A: True

Q: Can you track phone calls as conversions with Enhanced Campaigns?
A: Yes

Q: Can you track sales transactions as conversions with Enhanced Campaigns?
A: Yes

Q: Can you track text messages as conversions with Enhanced Campaigns?
A: No

Q: What are some features of a YouTube Brand channel?
A: Custom gadgets, house and curate video content, and develop social friendships with YouTube users.

Q: True or False: Use the Placement Report is a good idea when using Site and Category exlusions.
A: True

Q: True or False: You can limit exposure to your ads through site/category exclusions.
A: True

Q: True or False: You can limit exposure to your ads by including negative keywords.
A: True

Q: What tool can you use to target different categories of video content on the Display Network?
A: AdWords for Video

Q: Can your video mimic functions that an ad can not perform?
A: No. Your ad is likely to be disapproved.

Q: Using AdWords, can you target mobile apps?
A: Yes.

Q: What would you use to target relevant sites on the Display Network based on a list of keywords?
A: Managed Placements

Q: What is the payment model for a YouTube homepage masthead advertisement?
A: These are sold on a fixed cost per day model.

Q: How can you optimize your CPC-based campaign?
A: Focus on a high CTR, ad rank, and Quality Score.

Q: What will Frequency Capping do?
A: It will limit the number of times an ad appears to the same unique user on the Display Network.

Q: True or False: You can set individual bids for sites you select for Managed Placements advertisements.
A: True

Q: Can you use Frequency Capping on the Search Network?
A: No, this feature is available only for ads on the Display Network.

Q: Can you track the Mouseover Rate on ads built with the Display Ad Builder?
A: Yes

Q: True or False: Topic Targeting is likely to ensure ads are contextually relevant to the sites they appear on.
A: True

Q: Will all of your performance metrics be lost if you edit an ad with an ad extension, if you are using Enhanced Campaigns?
A: No.

Q: True or False: Using a color scheme that complements the image and branding on your site is recommended when using the Display Ad Builder.
A: True.

Q: Where are ads using images and videos shown?
A: They would only be shown on the Google Display Network.

Q: For direct response marketing, which is the ideal bidding model?
A: Cost per click

Q: True or False: YouTube homepage ads are available through AdWords.
A: False

Q: True or False: YouTube watch page ads are available through AdWords.
A: True

Q: True or False: YouTube search page ads are available through AdWords.
A: True

Q: Why should you include a text ad in your Display Network campaign, even if you want to focus on image/video?
A: Not all publishers accept image/video ads, so having a text ad will ensure maximum coverage.

Q: True or False: You can use Pop-Up ads on the Google Display Network.
A: False

Q: True or False: You can use Print Ads through a Display Network campaign.
A: False

Q: What is one reason to consider different messages in your video ads than in your text/search ads?
A: Video search behavior is different than search behavior on a traditional search engine like Google.

Q: True or False: You can utilize pre-existing design templates with the Google Display Ad Builder tool.
A: True

Q: Should you use a Call to Action in the opening image of a click-to-play video?
A: Yes, this is considered a best practice for this type of advertisement.

Q: When would you pay for a TrueView in-search advertisement?
A: Only if a viewer chooses to watch the video.

Q: What aspect of an ad would help set expectations for users in different stages of the buying cycle?
A: A clear Call to Action in the text portion of a text, video, or image advertisement.

Q: True or False: You can incorporate an error message or warning box in your image ad.
A: False, this will get your ad disapproved.

Q: True or False, you can use a strobe background in your Display Network ads.
A: False, this will get your ad disapproved.

Q: Which bidding model allows advertisers to pay by the conversion?
A: Cost per acquisition (CPA)

Q: What is the best bidding model to increase reach and visibility?
A: Cost per thousand impressions (CPM)

Q: What type of bidding model do reservation ads use?
A: They are a fixed price, so no bidding is used.

Add Google AdWords Dynamic Remarketing Code to Magento CMS & Home Pages

In a previous tutorial, we looked at how to add Google AdWords Dynamic Remarketing code to Magento’s product pages. That gets us some of the way there, and you can start remarketing with just that bit of code on your site (verified working on a live Magento Enterprise website).

Integrate Google Dynamic Remarketing in Magento

However, there are a lot more pages we can tag with the remarketing code, including the home pages, category and subcategory pages and listings, and CMS pages. We’ll take a look at the home page and static CMS pages in this tutorial, and tackle category pages in future one.

The reason we do the home page and CMS pages at the same time is that Google has a separate pagetype for each of these pages. If you add the CMS code to your Magento home page, though, you won’t have the correct pagetype. And if you add the home page code just on that page, you’ll need to remove the CMS page code to prevent having both tags on the home page.

Let’s tackle the CMS pages first, since they are remarkably similar to the product pages.

Creating or Adding to the local.xml File

First, navigate to your magentoroot/app/design/frontend/base/default/layout/ directory, and open the local.xml file located there. If you don’t have one, you’ll need to create one, and if you’re using a different package/theme, navigate to the correct folder rather than base/default as I did here.

In that local.xml file, we’re going to add the following code to it:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!-- other code -->
<layout>
<!-- other layout code -->
	<cms_page>
		<reference name="before_body_end">
			<block type="core/template" name="trafficmotion.remarketingCms">
				<action method="setTemplate">
					<template>trafficmotion/remarketing/cms.phtml</template>
				</action>
			</block>
		</reference>
	</cms_page>
</layout>

Easy enough, right? Now, we have to get the proper directory so that Magento knows what file to pull from where, and put the right code in that file.

Directory Structure for AdWords Dynamic Remarketing Code Layout

Here are the folders that we need to navigate to if you’ve read my previous AdWords Remarketing on Magento tutorial, or create them if they don’t yet exist.

  • magentoroot/app/design/frontend/base/default/template/trafficmotion/
  • magentoroot/app/design/frontend/base/default/template/trafficmotion/remarketing/

Next, we’ll get the actual code for the CMS pages. Magento is looking for the block to insert before the closing <body> tag, so let’s give it what it wants.

Creating the cms.phtml File

Since we don’t need to call any paramaters like the SKU or total value on the CMS pages, we don’t need any fancy PHP code. Plain old HTML will do just fine, though we still need to name our file with the PHTML extension. Create cms.phtml and add the following code to it:

<!-- Begin Google Code for Remarketing Tag -->
<script type="text/javascript">
var google_tag_params = {
ecomm_prodid: '',
ecomm_pagetype: 'siteview',
ecomm_totalvalue: '',
};
</script>
<script type="text/javascript">
/* <![CDATA[ */
var google_conversion_id = XXXXXXXXXX;
var google_custom_params = window.google_tag_params;
var google_remarketing_only = true;
/* ]]> */
</script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="//www.googleadservices.com/pagead/conversion.js">
</script>
<noscript>
<div style="display:inline;">
<img height="1" width="1" style="border-style:none;" alt="" src="//googleads.g.doubleclick.net/pagead/viewthroughconversion/XXXXXXXXXX/?value=0&amp;guid=ON&amp;script=0"/>
</div>
</noscript>
<!-- End Google Code for Remarketing Tag -->

Remember to use the actual code that Google gives you for your site. Your conversion ID probably isn’t XXXXX. Also remember to set the ecomm_pagetype to ‘siteview’ so AdWords knows what pagetype these are.

Wrapping Up Dynamic Remarketing Integration for CMS Pages

That’s all there is to adding the remarketing tag to your CMS pages. The only problem is, the code now appears on the homepage, as well as all other CMS pages. We’ll look at getting rid of it on the homepage next, as well as inserting the correct code. But here’s how the code will look on the actual pages of your Magento store:

<p class="bugs">Help Us to Keep Magento Healthy - <a href="http://www.magentocommerce.com/bug-tracking" onclick="this.target='_blank'"><strong>Report All Bugs</strong></a> (ver. 1.8.1.0)</p>
        <address>&copy; 2013 Magento Demo Store. All Rights Reserved.</address>
    </div>
</div>
                
<!-- Begin Google Code for Remarketing Tag -->
<script type="text/javascript">
var google_tag_params = {
ecomm_prodid: '',
ecomm_pagetype: 'siteview',
ecomm_totalvalue: '',
};
</script>
<script type="text/javascript">
/* <![CDATA[ */
var google_conversion_id = XXXXXXXXXX;
var google_custom_params = window.google_tag_params;
var google_remarketing_only = true;
/* ]]> */
</script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="//www.googleadservices.com/pagead/conversion.js">
</script>
<noscript>
<div style="display:inline;">
<img height="1" width="1" style="border-style:none;" alt="" src="//googleads.g.doubleclick.net/pagead/viewthroughconversion/XXXXXXXXXX/?value=0&amp;guid=ON&amp;script=0"/>
</div>
</noscript>
<!-- End Google Code for Remarketing Tag -->
    </div>
</div>
</body>
</html>

Removing the CMS Remarketing Code from the Homepage

We’re going to go back to the local.xml file we used up above, located at magentoroot/app/design/frontend/base/default/layout/local.xml and add the following code to that file:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!-- other code  -->
<layout>
<!-- other layout code -->
	<cms_index_index>
		<reference name="before_body_end">
			<remove name="trafficmotion.remarketingCms" />
		</reference>
	</cms_index_index>

That gets rid of the remarketingCms block on the homepage, so now we’re free to add the correct code. We could do another local.xml layout update, but since we’re adding a block just to one page, we can more easily do this in the backend of Magento with a static block and a layout XML update to the homepage.

Creating the Static Block

Login to the admin area of your store, and navigate to CMS > Static Blocks and click +Add New Block in the upper right corner of the page. Let’s give it a Block Title of Google Remarketing Code – Homepage, an Identifier of google-remarketing-home, and choose your appropriate Store View. Enable the block and put the following code in the Content section:

<!-- Begin Google Code for Remarketing Tag -->
<script type="text/javascript">
var google_tag_params = {
ecomm_prodid: '',
ecomm_pagetype: 'home',
ecomm_totalvalue: '',
};
</script>
<script type="text/javascript">
/* <![CDATA[ */
var google_conversion_id = XXXXXXXXXX;
var google_custom_params = window.google_tag_params;
var google_remarketing_only = true;
/* ]]> */
</script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="//www.googleadservices.com/pagead/conversion.js">
</script>
<noscript>
<div style="display:inline;">
<img height="1" width="1" style="border-style:none;" alt="" src="//googleads.g.doubleclick.net/pagead/viewthroughconversion/XXXXXXXXXX/?value=0&amp;guid=ON&amp;script=0"/>
</div>
</noscript>
<!-- End Google Code for Remarketing Tag -->

Now, all we have to do is add that block to the before_body_end section of our homepage. Navigate to CMS > Pages > Manage Content and look for the page with the URL key of “home” and open that page.

In the Design tab, we’re going to add some XML code, and then we’ll be all done. Here’s what we need to add to that page.

<reference name="before_body_end">
<block type="cms/block" name="google_remarketing">
    <action method="setBlockId"><block_id>google-remarketing-home</block_id></action> 
</block>
</reference>

Wrapping Up Dynamic Remarketing Integration for the Homepage

Whew! We’re all done here. Take a look at the Page Source on the homepage, and you’ll see the correct dynamic remarketing code, without the extra reference to the CMS page remarketing code. Here’s what it looks like after we’re finished:

<p class="bugs">Help Us to Keep Magento Healthy - <a href="http://www.magentocommerce.com/bug-tracking" onclick="this.target='_blank'"><strong>Report All Bugs</strong></a> (ver. 1.8.1.0)</p>
        <address>&copy; 2013 Magento Demo Store. All Rights Reserved.</address>
    </div>
</div>
                
<!-- Begin Google Code for Remarketing Tag -->
<script type="text/javascript">
var google_tag_params = {
ecomm_prodid: '',
ecomm_pagetype: 'home',
ecomm_totalvalue: '',
};
</script>
<script type="text/javascript">
/* <![CDATA[ */
var google_conversion_id = XXXXXXXXXX;
var google_custom_params = window.google_tag_params;
var google_remarketing_only = true;
/* ]]> */
</script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="//www.googleadservices.com/pagead/conversion.js">
</script>
<noscript>
<div style="display:inline;">
<img height="1" width="1" style="border-style:none;" alt="" src="//googleads.g.doubleclick.net/pagead/viewthroughconversion/XXXXXXXXXX/?value=0&amp;guid=ON&amp;script=0"/>
</div>
</noscript>
<!-- End Google Code for Remarketing Tag -->
    </div>
</div>
</body>
</html>

That was one of our longest Magento tutorials yet, but was an important one for getting the AdWords Dynamic Remarketing code to display correctly on our static pages and our homepage. In our next tutorial, we’ll look at adding the code to the category view pages.

Magento Google AdWords Dynamic Remarketing Tutorials

Internet Marketing Tools Collection by TrafficMotion

This list is an ongoing work in progress. The goal is to provide a useful and broad list of internet marketing links. It will range from web analytics, to search engine optimization, social media, paid online advertising, conversion optimization, affiliate and email marketing, and more.

Online Marketing Tools from TrafficMotion

Stay tuned for weekly, if not daily, updates to this list of internet marketing tools.

Web Analytics

Competitive Intellligence

Call Tracking

Search Engine Optimization

Local SEO

Social Media

Paid Online Advertising

Keyword Research

Email Marketing

Conversion Optimization

Miscellaneous Tools

Add Google AdWords Dynamic Remarketing Code to Magento Product Pages

Google AdWords Dynamic Remarketing is an excellent way to entice customers back to your store, and one of the most effective uses of your pay per click budget. You can market the very products to them that they were considering while on your website. Get them there through ecommerce SEO or traditional search/display network Google/Bing ads or social media, and them continue to advertise to them through this channel with ads tailored to their personal tastes.

Integrate Google Dynamic Remarketing in Magento

However, the main sticking point is that the dynamic remarketing code needs to be added only to your product pages in your Magento store, as the code looks for the ecommerce product ID (ecomm_prodid), page type (ecomm_pagetype), and total value (ecomm_totalvalue). Also, the code needs to go before the closing <body> tag on these pages.

This means that simply adding the code in the backend of your Magento store is out, as the “Miscellaneous Scripts” section adds code right before the closing <head> tag. So let’s make a simply layout update to our Magento theme to get the Dynamic Remarketing code to show up on product display pages before the closing <body> tag.

Creating or Adding to the local.xml File

First, we need to open (or create, if it’s not there already) the local.xml file located in the magentoroot/app/design/frontend/base/default/layout/ folder, and add the following code to it:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!-- other code -->
<layout>
<!-- other layout code -->
	<catalog_product_view>
		<reference name="before_body_end">
			<block type="catalog/product_view" name="trafficmotion.remarketing">
				<action method="setTemplate">
					<template>trafficmotion/remarketing/code.phtml</template>
				</action>
			</block>
		</reference>
	</catalog_product_view>
</layout>

This adds the layout update to the product pages and references the file that will insert the code into the pages (, as well as tells Magento where to put it (before_body_end).

Directory Structure for AdWords Dynamic Remarketing Code Layout

Next, we create the folders that are referenced in the layout.xml file, so Magento finds what it’s looking for in the place we told it to look. Create these folders:

  • magentoroot/app/design/frontend/base/default/template/trafficmotion/
  • magentoroot/app/design/frontend/base/default/template/trafficmotion/remarketing/

If you read some of my earlier articles on integrating Open Graph and Twitter Cards into Magento, you should already have the /trafficmotion/ folder, so all you’d have to do is create the /remarketing/ folder.

Creating the code.phtml File

Now, finally, we can insert the dynamic remarketing code into Magento. You’ll need to grab this code snippet from your AdWords account. Set up at least one remarketing campaign, and then you can grab the code there, or grab it from the “Shared Library” link in your list of AdWords Campaigns.

Either way, the raw code from Google will look something like this, which we’ll have to modify a bit.

<script type="text/javascript">
var google_tag_params = {
ecomm_prodid: 'REPLACE_WITH_VALUE',
ecomm_pagetype: 'REPLACE_WITH_VALUE',
ecomm_totalvalue: 'REPLACE_WITH_VALUE'
};
</script>
<script type="text/javascript">
/* <![CDATA[ */
var google_conversion_id = XXXXXXXXXX;
var google_conversion_label = "YYYYYYYYYY";
var google_custom_params = window.google_tag_params;
var google_remarketing_only = true;
/* ]]> */
</script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="//www.googleadservices.com/pagead/conversion.js">
</script>
<noscript>
<div style="display:inline;">
<img height="1" width="1" style="border-style:none;" alt="" src="//googleads.g.doubleclick.net/pagead/viewthroughconversion/XXXXXXXXXX/?value=0&amp;label=YYYYYYYYYY&amp;guid=ON&amp;script=0"/>
</div>
</noscript>

Take that code, and create a code.phtml file. Inside of it, modify the lines for the ecomm_prodid, ecomm_pagetype, and ecomm_totalvalue so that the values will be inserted dynamically on different product pages.

BUG FIX – in the prior version of this code, we were echoing the currency before including it before the getFinalPrice call. Turns out, AdWords doesn’t need the currency, so we’re just going to take that out of it. Here’s the updated version of the code.phtml file.

<?php
$_helper = $this->helper('catalog/output');
$_product = $this->getProduct();
$currency = Mage::app()->getLocale()->currency(Mage::app()->getStore()->getCurrentCurrencyCode())->getSymbol();
if($_product):
?>

<!-- Begin Google Code for Remarketing Tag -->
<script type="text/javascript">
var google_tag_params = {
ecomm_prodid: '<?php echo $_product->getSku() ?>',
ecomm_pagetype: 'product',
ecomm_totalvalue: '<?php echo Mage::helper('tax')->getPrice($_product, $_product->getFinalPrice(), true); ?>',
};
</script>
<script type="text/javascript">
/* <![CDATA[ */
var google_conversion_id = XXXXXXXXXX;
var google_custom_params = window.google_tag_params;
var google_remarketing_only = true;
/* ]]> */
</script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="//www.googleadservices.com/pagead/conversion.js">
</script>
<noscript>
<div style="display:inline;">
<img height="1" width="1" style="border-style:none;" alt="" src="//googleads.g.doubleclick.net/pagead/viewthroughconversion/XXXXXXXXXX/?value=0&amp;guid=ON&amp;script=0"/>
</div>
</noscript>
<!-- End Google Code for Remarketing -->
<?php endif; ?>

Wrapping Up Dynamic Remarketing Integration

And that’s all! However, remember to match up your product ID with whatever you’re sending Google in your product feed. If you’re sending the SKU, make sure that’s what you’re grabbing from Magento. Also remember to make the page type ‘product’ and make sure that your code is showing your actual account number, rather than all those XXXXXX lines in the sample code.

In any event, if you did everything correctly, you can go to any of the product pages in your store, and see this before the end of the page. We’ll look at the Nokia 2610 page from the default Magento 1.8.1.0 install with the sample data. It looks like this, including some of the last bits of the footer:

<p class="bugs">Help Us to Keep Magento Healthy - <a href="http://www.magentocommerce.com/bug-tracking" onclick="this.target='_blank'"><strong>Report All Bugs</strong></a> (ver. 1.8.1.0)</p>
        <address>&copy; 2013 Magento Demo Store. All Rights Reserved.</address>
    </div>
</div>
                
<!-- Begin Google Code for Remarketing Tag -->
<script type="text/javascript">
var google_tag_params = {
ecomm_prodid: 'asc',
ecomm_pagetype: 'product',
ecomm_totalvalue: '134.99',
};
</script>
<script type="text/javascript">
/* <![CDATA[ */
var google_conversion_id = XXXXXXXXXX;
var google_custom_params = window.google_tag_params;
var google_remarketing_only = true;
/* ]]> */
</script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="//www.googleadservices.com/pagead/conversion.js">
</script>
<noscript>
<div style="display:inline;">
<img height="1" width="1" style="border-style:none;" alt="" src="//googleads.g.doubleclick.net/pagead/viewthroughconversion/XXXXXXXXXX/?value=0&amp;guid=ON&amp;script=0"/>
</div>
</noscript>
<!-- End Google Code for Remarketing -->
    </div>
</div>
</body>
</html>

Magento Google AdWords Dynamic Remarketing Tutorials

Notes on “Advanced Google Adwords,” Chs. 13-17

This is the final set of key takeaways from Brad Geddes‘ book Advanced Google AdWords, Second Edition. For being such a long book, it’s a pretty quick read, relatively speaking. There are a lot of screenshots and figures throughout each chapter, and larger section headings and frequent lists make the book go by much quicker than one would expect.

Advanced Google Adwords bookI think this might be the current best introduction to Google AdWords, and his credentials speak for themselves. He is the only AdWords Seminar Leader picked by Google to hold advanced seminars for AdWords advertisers. Again, I don’t think the book will help you pass any of the Advanced AdWords Individual Qualification tests, but it is probably enough to get an 80-90% passing grade on the Fundamentals test.

More importantly, the book will give you a solid background for the philosophy of putting AdWords to its best use. That is probably more important to your future success with AdWords anyway. Yes, employers and clients will want to know that you are certified in AdWords, but they will be more impressed with your ability to optimize their accounts and maximize their profitability. In addition, there are a handful of questions on the Google Analytics Individual Qualification exam regarding AdWords, and this book covers those aspects very nicely.

Chapter 13. Profitable Bid Strategies

Use the AdWords conversion tracking script to track which keywords and ads lead to conversions on your website.

You can track conversions types like leads, sales, signups, page views, or others.

Do not use the Budget Optimizer if you assign different values to different keywords in your campaigns.

One best practice for Budget Optimizer can be a branding campaign, where Google optimizes for clicks and awareness, rather than conversions.

You need at least 15 conversions over the past 30 days for Conversion Optimizer to work.

You can only use CPM bidding on the Display Network.

Return on Ad Spend = Revenue / Cost

If you are a content publishing website, you should track Revenue per Visitor (or Revenue per 1,000 Visitors).

If you use ad scheduling, remember that your ads are run based on your time zone (set up in AdWords), not the time zone of your customers.

Look at the Click-Assisted Conversions report to see which keywords assist on conversions.

Chapter 14. Successful Account Organization Strategies

My Client Center allows you to link more than one account together, using a single interface. This is good for people managing multiple clients’ accounts.

Use three campaigns for best practice: one for the Search Network, one for Display Network managed placements, and one for Display Network automatic placements.

Your Search Network campaign should eat up 40-60% of your budget.

Your Display Network campaign using automatic placements should be 10-20% of your budget.

The managed placements campaign on the Display Network should account for 30-60% of your budget.

Location Targeted campaigns may use multiple Search Network campaigns, each with different location targets and geographic modifiers.

Create your strategy first, then create the campaigns to reach your goals.

For a mobile targeted campaign, use shorter keywords since mobile searches are often shorter than searches done on desktop or laptop computers.

For day-scheduled campaigns, create one campaign and duplicate it for each day of the week, changing the ad copy based on the days and times targeted.

Make sure your ad copy reflects every keyword in the ad group. If it doesn’t, some of the keywords may need to be moved to their own ad groups.

Chapter 15. Testing Techniques That Will Increase Profits

Test ad copy and landing pages.

Dynamic Keyword Insertion may increase click-through rates, but not conversion rates.

When testing new ad copy, make sure the rotation settings will show ads evenly.

Try to run a test over the length of three sales cycles.

Testing for landing pages starts with which page to send your paid traffic to.

For branded keywords, trying using a “What’s New” page, rather than your company’s home page.

Test Thank You pages for which ones increase customer engagement with your website.

Start testing with dramatic differences between control and test versions, also known as A/B testing.

Differences between the ad copy, especially with images and video, and your landing page may confuse customers.

Reinforce discount codes or special offers on the landing page. If people see them in an ad, make sure they’re on the landing page, too!

Do A/B tests with ad copy.

The best metrics to track are profit per click and profit per impression.

AdWords Campaign Experiments allow for testing a subset of traffic.

Chapter 16. AdWords Reports: Extracting Actionable Information

When in doubt as to where a report is located, check the Dimensions tab.

The Impression Share report tells you how often your ads are not being run, and the reason why.

Use the Ad Performance report to discover the metrics for each of your ad copies.

Use reports to discover search queries which are costing you money but are not converting, and look for opportunities to add negative keywords.

One creative use of the Destination URLs report is to check your website for broken links.

Use Custom Reports to receive alerts if there are large changes such as much higher conversion rates or numbers.

Chapter 17. Step by Step: Create and Monitor Your AdWords Account

List your marketing goals, and then establish budgets to reach each goal. The minimum budget is $1.00 per day. Then set up conversion tracking code for each goal conversion page.

Create the campaigns after outlining your marketing goals. Then do keyword research, set up ad groups, and choose your landing pages.

Write one targeted ad per ad group to start with, and then conduct keyword research, also looking for negative keywords.

Remember to figure out which match types will work best for your budget, then write the ads and set your initial bids.

For the Display Network, use data gathered from your search network campaign to find groups of keywords that are working for you.

To optimize your campaigns, check your Quality Score for ways to improve it, test ad copy and landing pages, analyze search trends, and check for differences in performance based on geography.

Check the status of your campaigns everyday, looking for large changes.

Decide how often you’ll change your bids, whether that’s daily, weekly, monthly, or anything in between.

Take at least one day per week to look for changes in Quality Score and see if you can boost low ones.

Use the Search Query report to discover new keywords that you can individually target and add to relevant ad groups.

Remember to look at demographics information to determine if you want to made adjustments to your bids based on the demographics of websites or searchers.

So that wraps up that book! Please let me know in the comments section if you enjoyed this series of key takeaways from Advanced Google Adwords. Personally, I think it was more fun than writing a simple book review, but definitely took quite a bit longer.

Check out Chapters 1-4, Chapters 5-8, and Chapters 9-12, if you haven’t read them before. And remember, if you want to purchase the book, you can find it on Amazon here.

Notes on “Advanced Google Adwords,” Chs. 9-12

This is a somewhat shorter list of key takeaways from Brad Geddes‘ hugely important Advanced Google AdWords, Second Edition book. Why a bit shorter? Well, the main reason is that Chapter 12, on the Google AdWords Editor, is shorter than most of the other chapters in the book.

Advanced Google Adwords bookHowever, there is still some great info in that chapter and the preceding ones. This entry is almost all about the Display Network, from the basics, to advanced implementations, to advanced geographic targeting for both the Search and Display Networks.

There are only five chapters left in the book for me to cover, and I may do an overview review with my thoughts once these chapter notes have been completed. But let me stop wasting your valuable reading time, and let’s get to the notes from the book. Of course, if you want all of the info, just purchase the book on Amazon!

Chapter 9. Understanding the Display Network

Search page views make up only 3-5 percent of all of the pages viewed on the internet, and 3-5% of people’s time spent on the web.

Google assigns themes to pages on the display network based on the content of each page.

Google assigns themes to ad groups based on the keywords or other targeting options you select.

If the page’s theme and your ad group’s theme match, your ads are eligible to be displayed.

AdWords takes into account up to 50 keywords in each ad group, but 3-10 keywords are usually sufficient to establish a theme.

The Display Network reaches around 80% of internet users.

You can block your ads from showing up on sites at the domain, subdomain, and directory levels.

Placements can be on websites, feeds, mobile devices, games, and other places on the web.

CPM bids are first set at the ad group level. CPM bidding is most effective for maximizing exposure.

Use frequency capping on CPM campaigns and for your remarketing campaigns to limit the number of times people are exposed to your ads.

Chapter 10. Advanced Display Network Techniques

If your ads are not being shown on sites that seem relevant, change your keywords in that ad group.

Four categories of websites: low-quality, low-traffic, medium-quality, and high-quality sites.

For low conversion rates, use placement targeting until you perfect your offer and coordinate the message between your ad and the landing page.

Use a discovery campaign to cast a wide net for sites that send you traffic and convert. Then, put those sites into a managed placements campaign to target them individually.

You can set different bids for placements on individual websites. With placement targeting, you are targeting once spot where an ad shows up on a page, not the entire website or page.

If you use demographic bidding, you may want to set low maximum CPC bids at the ad group or placement level and boost those bids based on the demographics of the visitor.

Another idea is to use a demographic-targeting only campaign and include only the demographics-appropriate websites to that campaign.

If you use remarketing, your privacy policy page must disclose this to visitors.

Two ways to use remarketing are to nonconverting visitors for 7-60 days, and for converted customers for up to one year.

Bid higher for remarketing based on where visitors are in the buying cycle, and where they left your site (nonengaged, abandoned during checkout, converted).

Always set a frequency cap when doing remarketing so people don’t get tired of your ads. Also, use multiple ads with remarketing with different offers and themes.

Use general offers on your Display Network ads, rather than highly targeted offers.

Chapter 11. Advanced Geographic Targeting

Can target users based on country, state/province, metro area, and city, but not by county or neighborhood.

Limit campaigns to one country at the highest location targeting. Set up extra campaigns for additional countries you wish to target.

Use two campaigns: an IP campaign based on location targeting with no regional or local modifiers, and a GEO campaign targeting the entire country but with relevant locational modifiers.

If you use zip codes in your keyword list as modifiers, make sure they are not broad match as Google will match them with other zip codes which may be located further away.

Try using airport codes, area codes, zip codes, and regional modifiers, depending on the type of website and services you have.

Locals and out-of-towners search for your products and services in different ways with different keywords. Cover both of them, or try to exclude one of them, based on your business needs.

Use custom icons and optimize your Google Places page if you are a local business, so that you can stand out from the competition on local search results and local Google properties.

Use the geographic performance reports data to identify areas where your ads do well, and areas where you are not converting and may wish to establish a more specific campaign.

Chapter 12. Save Time and Scale Accounts with the AdWords Editor

Use the comments feature of the Editor to annotate changes you make and when.

Try not to post more than 10,000 keywords or 1,000 ad groups at a time.

If you have multiple people managing your AdWords campaigns, have one gatekeeper who can decide which updates get uploaded back to the AdWords account.

For large accounts, use Excel to generate tens or hundreds of thousands of keywords, then upload them through the Editor as one campaign.

You can also use Excel and the Editor to create hundreds of basic ads for very large campaigns.

Use conditional formatting in Excel to find out where your ad copy has gone over the character limits, and then change those ads.

Chapters 13-17 are coming up next, as soon as I go back through them and pull out the best highlights and notes that I took. In the meantime, you can check out my notes on Chapters 1-4, or Chapters 5-8. And remember to go read more about the book, including reviews, on Amazon, where you can also buy the book for your own reference.

Notes on “Advanced Google Adwords,” Chs. 5-8

Another day, another huge list of notes and key takeaways from my reading of Brad GeddesAdvanced Google AdWords, Second Edition. This is a little bit more in-depth with the tips, so you should have a decent background in AdWords and pay per click in general before implementing some of these ideas. However, you can never be aware of them too early, even if your campaigns are not currently at the stage where some of these concepts can be put into practice.

Advanced Google Adwords bookAs I mentioned yesterday, as well, this is only a very short synopsis of some of the key lessons that I learned from the book. If you pick it up, you’ll probably have a very different reading experience than I did. That’s what reading is all about, right? And there are so many more tips and explanations in the actual book than I could ever include here. It’s almost difficult leaving out so much material. Just go purchase the book!

In fact, this is probably the best single source of information and strategies for optimizing your campaigns on AdWords. From setting up a new account, to doing keyword research, to testing ads and landing pages, to ongoing campaign maintenance, Advanced Google AdWords has everything. The final step-by-step outline for success in Chapter 17 is almost worth the book alone, without even mentioning giving you enough information to pass the AdWords Fundamentals exam and being able to maximize success in PPC in general.

Chapter 5. Landing Pages that Convert Searchers Into Buyers

You have just a few seconds to make an impression with a landing page, make them count!

Remember to link your Google Analytics and AdWords account and enable autotagging. Otherwise, use the URL Builder Tool to add campaign tracking parameters to your Destination URLs.

A small point, but umlauts (special characters) are not allowed in URLs in AdWords.

Send visitors to the right page that answers their question. Don’t let them just wander around your site or hit the Back button if you can direct them to a more relevant page to begin with.

Informational queries are often under-monetized, mainly due to incorrect landing pages. If you want to monetize an informational query, choose or design an appropriate page to direct traffic to.

Answer the question first, then try to move visitors further through the buying cycle.

Local and nonlocal searchers have different needs, and often different search queries.

Utilize Thank You pages, don’t just thank visitors and send them away. Try to get them to further engage with your website.

Tell your visitors what action you want them to take at the top of your website in order to maximize conversion rates. Include calls to action above the fold.

Testimonials often lead to higher conversion rates. Consumers aren’t bored of them or blind to them yet, so include testimonials if you have them.

If you include a special offer or discount code in your ad, make sure to reinforce it on the landing page. Don’t leave it off the page, and then expect visitors to remember is. They won’t!

Be conservative with buttons on your pages. Include one or two, but don’t go overboard as people won’t know what’s important.

Chapter 6. Advanced Optimization Techniques

An Impression Share of 85-95% may be very difficult, if not impossible to raise further.

If your ads are being shown most of the time and you still need more exposure, you need to add more keywords to your campaign.

Keep in mind the formatting of the word “keyword” in Dynamic Keyword Insertion. “Keyword” and “KEYWord” will result in very different capitalization in your ads.

People often print pages on websites to read later.

Don’t give visitors too many options on your site. Tell them what you want them to do.

With a dedicated landing page, you can control a visitor’s entire experience on your website. Use them!

Try to keep the shopping cart process to three or fewer pages. The more pages, the higher the abandonment rate may get.

Chapter 7. Demystifying Quality Score

Your QS will influence your first page bid, ad rank, eligibility to appear on Display Network websites, and whether Placement Targeted ads will appear on websites.

CTR is the most important factor in Quality Score, and CTR is normalized by position.

Display URL click-through rates are tracked separately in Google AdWords, and a higher CTR for your Display URL may result in a higher QS.

Slow landing page load time? Lower Quality Score. Fix page bloat or long server response times.

Quality Score is calculated based on the Exact Match version of a keyword if you have multiple match types.

Include some navigation back to your main site on your landing pages. Google wants at least some navigation, or you’ll get a lower QS.

With CPM bidding, the only factor that determines Quality Score is the quality of the landing page.

Google attempts to determine relevance between keywords, ad copy, and landing pages.

You can not see QS history when running reports in AdWords, so have a report automatically emailed to you every week with QS and keep those as a record of Quality Scores.

You’ll want to use Excel to see your normalized Quality Score to determine where you can best make changes.

Chapter 8. Beyond Text: Image, Video, and Mobile Ads

You can create mobile-only campaigns by duplicating your existing campaign and setting the device targeting, then creating dedicated mobile-only landing pages.

Text ads on mobile devices are limited to two 18-character lines.

Image ads should be easy to understand: no one is going to read a bunch of text in an image ad.

For videos, test different opening images for the same video.

Use videos to tell a story and provide information, rather than advertise to consumers or simply promote a product.

When starting out in rich media ads, use the Google Display Ad Builder to test what works for your site.

There are a ton of options for advertising on YouTube through your AdWords account: video ads, in-stream video ads, expandable video ads, and in-video static images.

Here is the review of Chapters 1-4, Chapters 9-12, and Chapters 13-17. Hopefully, reading these takeaways that I got out of the book will give you a deeper understanding of AdWords, and make you more curious to read Geddes’ book itself. I’ve also taken his course at MarketMotive and found it extremely valuable, so check out that as well!

Notes on “Advanced Google Adwords,” Chs. 1-4

Lately, I’ve been reading Advanced Google AdWords, Second Edition (also available on Amazon Kindle), by Brad Geddes and published by Sybex. The book is a huge, nearly 600 page account of how AdWords works and how to get the most out of it. Here are some of my key takeaways from this book’s first four chapters. Over the next few days, I’ll post some more notes that I’ve taken from the book.

Advanced Google Adwords bookBut before I begin, the question you’re probably wondering is whether this book alone will help you pass the Google AdWords Individual Qualification exam. The answer is yes and no. Yes, you can read this book alone and easily pass the Fundamentals exam. But no, it probably won’t be enough to pass any of the Advanced exams.

For the Advanced exams, you’ll probably want to spend a lot more time in the Google Adwords Help Center, and read Brad Frese’s study guide on the Search Advanced test. Reading all of the AdWords material from Google would be close to 1,000 pages of information, far more than Geddes’ book contains, but the main focus of his book is not on passing the exams anyway. The main focus of this book is providing you with best practices for AdWords overall, to make your clients and employer happy, rather than just adding one more certification to your resume.

Chapter 1. Understanding Search Theory

The chapter contains a very interesting history of paid online advertising. Worth a read, but won’t really help you with anything practical.

People think in terms of concepts and their search queries are simply reflections of those concepts. Also, landing pages should be an extension of the ad copy, which will ideally be an extension of the search query!

People want information, not advertisements. But an advertisement presented as information will not register as advertising.

Chapter 2. Keyword Research

It’s important to understand where keywords fall in the buying cycle. Informational keywords are more difficult to monetize than transactional ones.

People don’t know your industry jargon until the learning stage of the buying funnel, after awareness and interest.

If a keyword is ambiguous in terms of its stage in the buying cycle, test different landing pages and ad copy!

Four types of keywords: explicit, problem, symptom, and product name.

Think of your ad groups as themes and group related keywords into their own themes. Building on this, create your ad groups first, then get keywords for them.

Go wide with your keyword list before going deep.

Chapter 3. Keyword Tools: Extracting Valuable Data from Google

Use keyword tools to identify synonyms and related keywords.

Spider every page related to your products and services that you come across on the web to expand your keyword ideas.

Don’t just rely on Google for keyword ideas, also check out WordTracker and WordStream.

Breakout keywords have search volume that has increased by more than 5,000 percent.

Chapter 4. Writing Compelling Ads

Go granular: make sure keywords are highly related so you can write relevant ad copy.

People want more control, more freedom, more time, more money, better health, social advancement, security, enjoyment, etc. They avoid more work, doubt, guilt, pain, being ignored, and so on.

Turn features into benefits by adding “so,” “to,” and “will” to your products’ list of features.

When starting out, don’t be afraid to use standard ad copy formats, then test and experiment later.

People focus on the number in ads that is most advantageous to them.

Try using the word “Secret” in your ad copy. Remember, people like feeling included.

If you want to include a trademark in your ad copy, be prepared for the exception request process.

That’s all for today! I finished this book a while ago and have been going back through, looking for highlights and compiling the best of them. Hopefully, tomorrow’s insights will be a little better, since much of the early chapters were a bit more introductory in nature.

Here are Chapters 5-8, Chapters 9-12, and Chapters 13-17, all finished. Also, check the book out here on Amazon if you think it can help you become better at Adwords.

36 More Questions and Answers on Google AdWords

So you read our original “106 Questions You Need to Know for the Google AdWords Fundamentals Certification Exam,” but you need more material to study for the Google AdWords Individual Qualification exams. Really? Even after we gave you all those answers?!

pay per click blog iconOk, here is a small addition that should cover many more Fundamentals questions that could come up on your exam. There are some basic questions in this list that I just didn’t cover in the original study guide, while others slightly more uncommon topics that you might not run into at all during the exam.

But better to be safe than sorry, right?

Q: Which keyword match type includes synonyms, misspellings, and related terms?
A: Broad match. Exact and Phrase Match now include misspellings and synonyms, but not related terms.

Q: Will adding negative keywords affect your ads’ relevancy?
A: In general, yes.

Q: Which type of keyword will attract the most qualified clicks and traffic to your landing page?
A: Exact match.

Q: Using Modified Broad Match, what does the plus (+) sign indicate when you add it to a keyword?
A: The word directly following the plus (+) symbol is marked as more important and should match closely to the search query term.

Q: What is the most common type of search query?
A: Informational queries.

Q: If you place a keyword in an Ad Group, will that keyword trigger ads throughout your campaign?
A: No. It will only trigger ads in that Ad Group. Keywords can not be added at a Campaign level.

Q: In general, which type of keyword is the easiest to monetize; ie, the best-converting?
A: Transactional, where searchers are actively looking for a specific product or service.

Q: What is a navigational query?
A: When someone knows the particular website they want to go to, but types in the site’s name in the search engine to navigate to it.

Q: If you set up a new campaign for “Chicago Website Design” and target the United States in the geographical settings, where will users see your ads?
A: Throughout all of the United States. Set it to just Chicago if you only want to target that city.

Q: Is geographical targeting completely accurate? That is, will people outside the area you target see your ad, and will people inside the area you target not be served your ad?
A: Yes, this can happen. Geo targeting is not 100% accurate.

Q: Which percentage of mobile users have a local intent when conducting a search query?
A: It is estimated at 20%.

Q: Where can you use frequency capping and Cost Per Thousand Impressions (CPM) bidding?
A: Only on the Display Network.

Q: What is the effect of frequency capping?
A: It limits the number of times an individual sees your ad over a given time frame.

Q: What types of ads can you run on the Display Network?
A: Text ads, image ads, video ads, and rich media ads.

Q: How should you measure success on the Display Network?
A: Overall Cost Per Conversion; NOT CPC or conversion rate.

Q: What is the formula for conversion rate?
A: Number of conversions divided by the number of clicks

Q: Where should you place conversion code on your website?
A: In general, place it on the Thank You or Confirmation page.

Q: What is the formula for Cost Per Conversion?
A: Average Cost Per Click divided by the Conversion Rate

Q: What is one disadvantage of using automatic bidding for a PPC campaign?
A: You have no control over Cost Per Click at the keyword level.

Q: What information will the Google Bid Simulator give you?
A: It will tell you the number of clicks you can expect if you increase your bids.

Q: At what level can you set Destination URLs?
A: At the Keyword and Ad Copy level.

Q: What is the formula for calculating Ad Rank?
A: Keyword Quality Score multiplied by the Maximum Cost Per Click.

Q: Should you keep Search and Display Network campaigns separate, or combine them?
A: Keep them separate.

Q: At what level is Quality Score set?
A: At the Keyword Level.

Q: Does match type factor into the Quality Score?
A: No.

Q: Does Click-Through Rate factor into Quality Score?
A: Yes.

Q: Does Relevancy factor into Quality Score?
A: Yes.

Q: Does Landing Page Load Time factor into Quality Score?
A: Yes.

Q: Does Account History factor into Quality Score?
A: Yes.

Q: What is the minimum amount of time an ad should be live to gather enough data for a test?
A: One week. One month is ideal, however.

Q: To test your ads, what is the best setting for ad rotation?
A: Rotate evenly.

Q: At what level are Campaign Experiments set?
A: At the Campaign Level.

Q: How many ad clicks should be considered the minimum for an ad test?
A: 300 clicks per ad will usually be enough to gauge the success of a new ad.

Q: How many conversions should be considered the minimum for an ad test?
A: 7 conversions is the minimum, but more would be better.

Q: You want to track Quality Score History. When is QS determined if you run a report?
A: Keyword Quality Score is determined at the time you run the report. Historical QS is not available in AdWords reports.

Q: With Search Network text ads that appear on the top of the results page, what is the effect of adding punctuation at the end of the first line of the description?
A: It causes the first description line to move up to the title line.

[Also, remember to check out the Google AdWords Certification Study Guide, and read my review of that short ebook. If you need a more comprehensive introduction to AdWords, check out Brad Geddes’ Advanced Google AdWords.]